From the desk of FRANK - Haunted art museum for kids (Japan's MoCA)

Hello and welcome!

Welcome to another edition of "From the desk", this time featuring a blast from the past (2013) in the art world that may come as news to some. Last summer, Japan's Contemporary Museum of Art hosted an interactive haunted art museum, where children could distort various classic paintings and emerge with a different perspective on how art museums function.

"GHOSTS, UNDERPANTS, and STARS" (2013)

This is the title of that exhibit, a collection of random words meant to invoke childhood, according to architects Koichi Suzuno and Shinya Kamuro. The concept behind the exhibit? "To challenge perspectives and norms... as children are encouraged to run, shout and touch -- activities usually forbidden in a gallery or museum" (source). Here at the FRANK, we currently have one interactive artwork on display, which is a series of panels that, when moved to the right or left with the pegs on the side, can create a unique image. However, it might be interesting to have a fully-interactive show at the FRANK, challenging our local artists to incorporate this interactivity into their own artworks.

above: Active distortion of Da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa portrait, a young museum visitor looks on. (img source) below: Screencap from the computer game Ib (img source)

above: Active distortion of Da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa portrait, a young museum visitor looks on. (img source)

below: Screencap from the computer game Ib (img source)

Transient

"Ib" Japanese survival puzzle game 

The image above is from a game released circa 2000 called Ib. The plot of Ib follows a young girl who one day gets lost in an art museum. The artworks begin to come to life and she must solve various puzzles involving keys and paintings in order to escape alive. This reminded me personally of the exhibit at Japan's MoCA: young Ib must manipulate the artworks in this RPG to navigate, as did the visitors at the 2013 "GHOSTS, UNDERPANTS, and STARS" installation. It would be interesting if the architects responsible for this exhibit were familiar with Ib and took inspiration from it for their work.

Your thoughts?

What are your thoughts on interactive art museums? Are they here to stay, or merely a temporary trend? Leave your opinion in the comments or tweet us @FrankGallery1